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The Web Ask Steven Smith

A Guide To Dog Training Collars

Stevenasmith.biz  Article Center   

Articles Courtesy of Stevenasmith.biz

A Guide To Dog Training Collars

By: Gina Marie Capatar

As more breeds of dogs are domesticated, the number of available dog training collars are also steadily increasing. Sometimes, it is so hard to keep up on what dog collars to use for your dogs.

Let me guide you through the maze of Dog training collars. Let us take a look at each of the available collars we can have for our dogs.

First, there is the buckle collar. The buckle collar is really like a buckle that we use for our trousers. Buckle collars have buckle fasteners too to secure it over the dog’s neck. The buckle collars for dogs come in different varieties. There are buckle collars that are flat, rolled, made in nylon, or made in leather. The most preferred buckle collars of owners are the ones made in nylon. They are easier to clean, don’t shrink and they come in different colors and styles. The leather ones, although it has been popular, is not very easy to clean and if wrongly washed they may shrivel or shrink.

Another Dog Training Collar especially used for flyball training and sled dog racing is the Martingale collars. Martingale collars provide “limited choke” on the dog’s neck. These collars are not so easy to come off as they really fit the neck of your dog in a very nice way. Martingale collars are so flexible and they eliminate the danger of choking even if the dog gets very excited.

Next is the, Limited Choke Collar. These collars are more like the choke chain but they have rings at the end to make room for a few inches of allowance. To use these collars, you just have to ease the dog training collar from the head of your dog and slip it down its neck and tighten it a little.

An outdated Dog training collar is the choke chain. This was formerly used by dog owners before the invention of the other types of collars. Mostly, choke chains were used for punishment and correction. When a dog misbehaves, the owner would just jerk on the leash and the dog would choke, letting him think twice of what he is doing. Before, choke chains were really made of chains but now they are mostly made of nylon. Choke chains really are a torture to dogs, in some cases when the jerking is very hard, it can damage the windpipe of the dog.

An innovation of the choke chain dog training collar is the Snap-around choke. This is like the choke chain but designed so as not to damage a dog’s windpipe. The snap-around choke is very snugly fit and it is worn up high the dog’s neck and when the leash is jerked, it does not damage the dog’s windpipe and does not jolt the dog that much.

Most of the collars we have discussed are worn around the dog’s neck. However, there are also dog training collars that are worn on the head. These collars are fit on the dog’s head with a leash attached under the dog’s muzzle. The principle of this is that, where the dog’s head is, its body will follow. The dog may not adjust that easily to wearing these kinds of dog collars and they may look like a pony halter or a muzzle.

Next is the Pronged or the German Pinch dog training collar. This collar is especially made for dogs that are wild, unruly and difficult to control. These collars apply pressure on the protruding areas in the dog’s neck therefore it effectively catches the dog’s attention. This kind of dog training collar does not damage the dog’s windpipe

Another dog training collar is the electronic collar. These collars set off radio waves that shock the dog. The consequence of using this kind of collar is that your dog will always leave on fear and negative anticipation of the next shock. Electronic collars should not be used by novice trainers as they may not know how to properly make use of this collar.
There is also this thing called the no-bark collars. These are generally not really collars but they are used to train dogs not to bark. It is oftentimes very damaging and not beneficial on the dog to use this kind of collar.

There are still so many dog training collars available. They are constantly evolving to make collars as comfortable and as dog-friendly as possible. Other dog training collars include: light-up collars, they light up or glow at night; ornamental collars; schutzhund training collars and many others.

An important thing in choosing a dog training collar is that they must cater to your needs and should not be damaging to any of the dog’s anatomy. It is also important to weigh the pros and cons of each kind of collar so that both you and your dog will be benefited from that dog training collar you have chosen.


About the Author: Gina Marie Capatar writes on a variety of topics. She is a freelance writer and the head writer for http://www.isnare.com You may contact her at gina@isnare.com or visit http://outsourcing.isnare.com for writing job proposals.

Source: www.isnare.com

 

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